Tuesday, May 29, 2012

RSPH Level 3 Award in HACCP for Food Manufacturing 19th and 20th July at Linlithgow Rugby Club

Level 3 HACCP


This qualification is primarily aimed at supervisors/ managers working within the food manufacturing industry, but will also be of benefit to caterers and retailers.

Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) provides an effective and practicable management tool for identifying food safety hazards and ensuring that adequate controls are in place.

This Level 3 qualification covers the importance of HACCP-based food safety management procedures, the preliminary processes for HACCP-based procedures, development of the procedures, monitoring of critical control points and corrective actions and the evaluation of the procedures

Outsource Solution place a particular emphasis on workshop activities to establish a robust understanding of the HACCP implementation process.

Holders of this qualification will have the appropriate knowledge and understanding to be an integral part of a HACCP team and to supervise the implementation of a HACCP-based system in the work environment.

This programme is delivered over two days and assessment is by a 90 minute examination consisting of 45 multiple-choice questions.

Internal Auditing


Syllabus

Background of the BRC Global Standard – Issue 6
BRC Scope
Objectives of Internal auditing
Systems / Compliance / Investigative Auditing
Validation / Verification
Appropriately trained Auditors
Scope of the Internal Audit
Audit Schedule and Risk Assessment
Internal Audits and HACCP
Auditor Skills
The audit trial.
Recording audit information.
Audit Report Writing
Corrective and Preventative Action
Management Review and Continuous Improvement


Course Outcomes
ü Proficiency in undertaking and documenting internal audits.
ü Fulfilling the Fundamental Clause of Internal Auditing of the BRC Global Standard.
ü Effective verification of Quality Management System.
ü Promotes Continual Improvement.
ü Facilitates Effective Management Review.
ü Reduces Customer Complaints.
ü Facilitates good resource management in the Technical Function.

If the above courses are of interest, please email us on the link below
Outsource Solution Email perry@outsourcesolution.co.uk

Friday, February 24, 2012

Phosphate in food is ‘health risk’ that should be labelled, claim researchers

Phosphate in food is ‘health risk’ that should be labelled, claim researchers
Post a commentBy Nathan Gray, 20-Feb-2012

Related topics: Science & Nutrition

Food products with high phosphate contents are damaging to the health of the general public, and as such should be labelled, say researchers behind a new study.


The report – published in Deutsches Ärzteblatt International – selectively reviewed research documenting the links between excessive phosphate and elevated risks of ill health and mortality – calling for a ‘traffic-light’ labelling system to be introduced for foods containing phosphate additives.

The researchers, led by Professor Eberhard Ritz of Nierenzentrum Heidelberg, Germany, reported that elevated serum phosphate concentrations have been found to be correlated with mortality in people with chronic renal failure, while high levels of phosphates in healthy people have been correlated with cardiovascular disease.

Ritz and his colleagues said they believe that “the public should be informed that added phosphate is damaging to health.”

“Furthermore, calls for labelling the content of added phosphate in food are appropriate,” they added.

Phosphates

Natural (organic) phosphate esters are found mainly in protein-rich foods, including dairy products, fish, meat, sausages, and eggs. Ritz and his team explained that these compounds are slowly broken down in the gastrointestinal tract and then slowly resorbed from the intestine.

“About 40% to 60% of the organic phosphate esters consumed in the diet are resorbed,” they said.

However, they noted that the phosphate content of industrially processed food is much higher than that of natural food, because polyphosphates are commonly used as an additive in industrial food production. Such ingredients can legally be added to food as preservatives, acidifying agents, acidity buffers, and emulsifying agents, whilst phosphate salts are also used in foods to intensify flavours, they said.

Phosphate additives also play an especially important role in the meat industry, where they are used as preservatives. They are also used as a component of melting salts in the production of soft cheeses and are found in flavoured soft drinks and powdered products.

“Because of the increased use of food additives, the estimated daily intake of phosphate-containing food additives has more than doubled since the 1990s, from just under 500 mg/day to 1000 mg/day,” said Ritz and colleagues.


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They noted that over 300 food additives have been approved for use in the European Union, with each given a “uniform designation” E number which must be marked on food packaging.

“The labelling requirement is, unfortunately, only qualitative, and not quantitative,” said the researchers. “The consumer ... cannot determine how much phosphate is actually present in each item, as neither the overall phosphate content nor the quantity of added phosphate is indicated.”

‘Need for action’

“In view of the known connection between dietary phosphate and organ calcification in patients with renal failure, as well as the growing realization that phosphate can damage health even in persons with normal kidneys, one may ask whether concrete interventions in health policy ought to be taken now, even though such steps cannot yet be supported by any findings from prospective interventional trials,” said Ritz.

The authors said one important step would be to inform physicians and the public thoroughly about the potential risks to cardiovascular and renal function arising from dietary phosphate consumption. However they added that “comprehensive labelling of phosphate additives in food – ideally, with a “traffic-light” scheme – would also be desirable.”

“The amount of added phosphate, whether low, medium, or high, should be indicated with a green, yellow, or red sign on the package,” they said noting that Finland and the United Kingdom already use similar systems to indicate salt content.

“In order for such measures to be implemented, support should be sought from the food industry, consumer protection organizations, medical societies, and governmental and quasi-governmental entities,” said Ritz and his team.

Source: Deutsches Ärzteblatt International
Volume 109, Issue 4, Pages 49-55; doi: 10.3238/arztebl.2012.0049
“Phosphate Additives in Food—a Health Risk”
Authors: E. Ritz, K. Hahn, M. Ketteler, M.K. Kuhlmann, J. Mann
This content is copyright protected
However, if you would like to share the information in this article, you may use the headline, summary and link below:

Phosphate in food is ‘health risk’ that should be labelled, claim researchers

Food products with high phosphate contents are damaging to the health of the general public, and as such should be labelled, say researchers behind a new study.

http://www.foodnavigator.com/Science-Nutrition/Phosphate-in-food-is-health-risk-that-should-be-labelled-claim-researchers
Keywords: food additive, phosphates, labelling

Wednesday, February 01, 2012





The next course date has been set.



Intermediate Level 3 HACCP course:- 22nd and 23rd March 2012



The above courses will be running at Linlithgow Rugby Club and will run from 0900 to 1700 each day.



The HACCP level 3 RSPH certificated course has plenty of work shop activities and is completed with a 1.5 hour exam set by RSPH. The course aims to ensure that delegates gather the necessary skills and confidence to be able to originate or contribute to HACCP studies. Currently over 50% of delegates attending this course with us have been achieving distinction level. The course includes all the workshop materials and templates, Carol Wallace course book as well as lunch and refreshments both days. Cost £650 + VAT per delegate.

If you require more information or wish to book a place please contact us directly by email:
perry@outsourcesolution.co.uk or complete the web form on www.outsourcesolution.co.uk

RSPH Level 3 HACCP course




The next course date has been set.



RSPH Intermediate Level 3 HACCP course:- 22nd and 23rd March 2012


The course will be running at Linlithgow Rugby Club and will run from 0900 to 1700 each day.



The HACCP level 3 RSPH certificated course has plenty of work shop activities and is completed with a 1.5 hour exam set by RSPH. The course aims to ensure that delegates gather the necessary skills and confidence to be able to originate or contribute to HACCP studies. Currently over 50% of delegates attending this course with us have been achieving distinction level. The course includes all the workshop materials and templates, Carol Wallace course book as well as lunch and refreshments both days. Cost £650 + VAT per delegate






Either email us at perry@outsourcesolution.co.uk or complete a web inquiry form on our web site www.outsourcesolution.co.uk

Monday, January 09, 2012

BRC Issue 6 Training

Dear All

All the best for 2012

As you are aware we have a change to the British Retail Consortium issue which happened on the 1st January 2012. There are some quite significant changes both in standard requirements and the audit protocol. Outsource Solution Ltd did the necessary training in September and is now a British Retail Consortium approved training provider again. As a result we can provide British Retail Consortium certificated training in the change to issue.

These courses include the following:-

Food Training Issue 6

Title

1-day Audit Techniques & Report Writing
1-day Conversion 5-6 for Manufacturers
2-day Conversion 5-6 for Auditors
2-day Understanding Requirements - Vertical Audit Traceability Challenge handout
2-day Understanding Requirements Issue 6
4-day Third Party Auditor

Internal Auditor - 2 Day

We will be running routine courses but it is always helpful to know your requirements.

As normal we will also be running L2 and L3 Certificated HACCP training and L2 and L3 Food Hygiene training at fairly frequent intervals.

Most of the courses will run at Linlithgow rugby club but on site training can also be arranged as required.

We will do our best to provide the training that fits your needs.

Kind regards
Duncan Perry

Thursday, July 28, 2011

BRC Issue 6

BRC Issue 6 Training

Outsource Solution will be providing BRC Issue 6 training. The training courses will start in September after we have completed the Train the Trainer issue 6 course which is one of the first to be run. Training can be provided as BRC approved training or as general awareness training. Although the standard has reduced in the number of clauses there are some significant changes in relation how audits will be conducted. In addition to the detail changes in the standard, we will be giving an insight into what can be expected in relation to the audits which are set to challenge your systems significantly more than previously. Certification bodies have now also been given KPIs with BRC and this will also affect how your audit will be conducted. This and much more will be provided at the training courses.

If you would like to pre book training for mid September on wards please contact us through our contact page below or email perry@outsourcesolution.co.uk. http://www.outsourcesolution.co.uk/contact.php

Duncan Perry

Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Ecoli0104 in Europe

EFSA publishes report from its Task Force on the E. coli O104:H4 outbreaks in Germany and France in 2011 and makes further recommendations to protect consumers
Press Release
5 July 2011

The EFSA Task Force established to coordinate investigations to track down the possible source of the French and German outbreaks of E. coli O104:H4 has concluded that one lot of fenugreek seeds imported from Egypt and used to produce sprouts is the most likely common link between the two outbreaks. However, it cannot be excluded that other lots of fenugreek imported from Egypt during the period 2009-2011 may be implicated. Based on these findings, EFSA recommends to the European Commission that all efforts be made to prevent any further consumer exposure to the suspect seeds and that forward tracing be carried out in all countries which may have received seeds from the concerned lots. In this context, EFSA continues to advise consumers not to grow sprouts for their own consumption and not to eat sprouts or sprouted seeds unless they have been cooked thoroughly.

In response to an urgent request from the European Commission regarding the ongoing outbreaks of Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC), serotype O104:H4, EFSA set up a Task Force on 26 June 2011 to provide immediate scientific assistance. EFSA scientists were joined on the Task Force by officials and experts from the European Commission, relevant EU Member States, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), the World Health Organisation (WHO) and Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO).

Since May 2011, an outbreak of Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) has been ongoing in Germany, though the number of new cases is rapidly decreasing. On 24 June 2011, French authorities reported an E. coli outbreak in the region of Bordeaux. Since the start of these outbreaks, there have been a large number of patients with bloody diarrhoea caused by STEC and an unusually high proportion of these have developed haemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). To date, the E. coli O104:H4 outbreak is responsible for 48 deaths in Germany and one in Sweden. The total number of cases reported in the EU, Norway and Switzerland is 4,178[1].

The analysis of information from the French and German outbreaks leads to the conclusion that an imported lot of fenugreek seeds which was used to grow sprouts imported from Egypt by a German importer, is the most likely common link but other lots may be implicated. The report highlights that negative results from microbiological tests carried out on seeds cannot be interpreted as proof that a lot is not contaminated with STEC.

In light of the findings from the ongoing investigation and the conclusions of the tracing back exercise leading to fenugreek seeds as the most likely common link between the German and French outbreaks, EFSA considers that its previous advice issued jointly with ECDC on 29 June with respect to consumer protection remains valid. As seeds sold for sprouting are often sold as seed mixes and cross-contamination cannot be excluded, it is important that consumers are advised not to grow sprouts for their own consumption, and also not to eat sprouts or sprouted seeds unless they have been cooked thoroughly. This advice will be kept under review in the light of developments.

In a letter to the European Commission, EFSA outlines the principal conclusions of its report and identifies several recommendations related to preventing possible consumer exposure to the suspect seeds as well as the value of carrying out a risk assessment on sprout production and processing in view of further protecting public health.

Technical report of EFSA: Tracing seeds, in particular fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) seeds, in relation to the Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) O104:H4 2011 Outbreaks in Germany and France
FAQ on Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC)

Friday, June 24, 2011

Food Technical Managers

Food Technical Managers

We have had a number of enquiries regarding Food Technical Positions. These are from both food manufacturing companies and from individuals looking for new technical positions. These enquiries have generally been in Scotland. We are happy to try and match companies with Technical staff that are looking for employment.
Let us know and we try to assist.

German Ecoli Outbreak

Lessons from the German E. Coli Outbreak
Episode highlights need to identify virulence gene, scientist says
Germany’s recent enormous E. coli outbreak points to the need to better identify and understand the virulence genes involved with this pathogen, said Pina Fratamico, PhD, a lead researcher at the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Center for Food Safety who has worked to draw attention to lesser-known types of E. coli.

So far, 36 people have died and more than 3,000 have been sickened in the outbreak, which was originally blamed on cucumbers grown in northern Spain but has apparently been traced to contaminated sprouts from Germany. The strain of E. coli involved, 0104:H4, has never been associated with a significant foodborne outbreak. More than 700 of the cases so far have progressed to hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a type of kidney failure that is usually only seen in about 7% of E. coli cases, according to Dr. Fratamico.

Genome sequencing conducted in China suggests that the bacterium is a type of hybrid that combines multiple virulence factors. While it carries the Shiga toxin 2 gene, it probably did not start out as a Shiga toxin-producing E. coli, or STEC, Dr. Fratamico said. “It’s lacking the eae gene and the hemolysin gene, which are found in most enterohemorrhagic E. coli,” she said. “That suggests that it probably started out as an enteroaggregative form of E. coli and picked up the Shiga toxin 2 gene through horizontal gene transfer. It probably also has other virulence genes that we’ll find out more about.”

And that, Dr. Fratamico said, underscores an essential avenue for future E. coli research. “Serogroup is important, but equally important, if not more so, is understanding what all the key virulence genes are. We can’t just look for [shiga toxin-producing E. coli]. Had we done a PCR [polymerase chain reaction] assay looking just for the combination of Shiga toxin and eae genes, which is common, we would have missed this strain.” (In fact, that’s what happened with the original STEC assays that inaccurately pinned the outbreak on Spanish cucumbers, which were contaminated with E. coli, just not with this particular supertoxin.)

Could the new hybrid strain of E. coli, which apparently originated in the Central African Republic, pop up again in Europe or elsewhere? It’s certainly possible, Dr. Fratamico said. “We need to understand what the reservoir is … how it gets into food, and what the characteristics of the strain are in detail to better know whether it is likely to happen again,” she said

Saturday, May 28, 2011

Large outbreak of haemolytic uraemic syndrome caused by E. coli in Germany – important advice for travellers

Large outbreak of haemolytic uraemic syndrome caused by E. coli in Germany – important advice for travellers
26 May 2011

The Health Protection Agency (HPA) is aware that Germany is currently experiencing a large outbreak of haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS), which is a serious complication from verocytotoxin-producing E. coli (VTEC) infection that requires hospitalisation. Since the second week of May, there have been reports of approximately 214 cases of HUS and two people are reported to have died.



The outbreak is mainly affecting adults - almost 70 per cent of who are female. The cases are occurring mainly in northern Germany, but there are also reports from southern and eastern Germany.

This strain of VTEC infection suspected in this outbreak is O104 which is a rare strain of the infection and seldom seen in the UK.

England has so far seen two cases in German nationals with compatible symptoms. Other European countries have also seen cases of HUS and bloody diarrhoea among returning travellers.

The German authorities believe that a food source of infection is likely, and, early studies implicate raw tomatoes, cucumbers and lettuce. Although it is not clear whether one or more of these food items are associated with the outbreak, as a precaution they are advising people in Germany against eating raw tomatoes, cucumbers and lettuce, especially in the north of the country, until further notice.

The HPA and the National Travel Health Network and Centre (NaTHNaC) advises anyone travelling to Germany to follow the advice from the German authorities. In addition, returning travellers with illness including bloody diarrhoea should seek urgent medical attention and make sure they mention any recent travel history.

The public health organisation in Germany investigating the outbreak also recommend following the standard food and water hygiene advice.

Dr Dilys Morgan, head of the gastrointestinal, emerging and zoonotic infections department at the HPA, said: "The HPA is actively monitoring the situation very carefully and liaising with the authorities in Germany, the European Centre for Disease Control (ECDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO) as to the cause of the outbreak.

"We are keeping a close watch for potential cases reported in England and are working with colleagues in the devolved administrations to recommend they do the same. In addition we are in the process of alerting health professionals to the situation and advising them to urgently investigate potential cases with a travel history to Germany."

The HPA is also working closely with the Department of Health and the Food Standards Agency. The FSA is monitoring the situation closely and if there are any implications for food distributed in the UK they will provide an update.

ENDS

Notes to editors:

1. In this outbreak many more people are suspected to have bloody diarrhoea, which can be serious, or milder forms of the infection which are usually self limiting and clears within seven days. The public health organisation investigating the outbreak in Germany is the Robert Koch Institute http://www.rki.de/

2. Haemolytic Uraemic Syndrome (HUS) is a serious complication from verocytotoxin-producing E. coli (VTEC) infection that affects the blood, kidneys and in severe cases, the central nervous system. It is a serious illness that requires treatment in hospital and can be fatal.

3. The number of severe cases of HUS in a short period is very unusual and the affected age groups in this outbreak are not typical – HUS is a more common complication from E. coli infection in children.

4. Escherichia coli (commonly referred to as E coli) bacteria usually cause diarrhoea which settles within seven days without treatment. There are many strains of the infection. Occasionally, serious kidney and blood complications can occur, such as HUS.

5. Most people normally carry harmless strains of E. coli in their intestine. Both the harmless strains and the strains that cause diarrhoea are acquired primarily through ingestion of contaminated food or water. Person-to-person and animal-to-human transmission is through the oral-faecal route.

6. Good hygiene is very important in preventing person-to person spread and small children should be supervised with hand washing after using the toilet and before eating. Advice on food safety can be found on the NHS Choices website: http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/homehygiene/Pages/Homehygienehub.aspx

7. Verocytotoxin- producing E. coli (VTEC) O104 is a rare serogroup and further testing of samples is needed to confirm this as the cause of the outbreak. Reports from Germany refer to the VTEC cases as cases of Shiga-toxin producing E. coli (STEC). VTEC is also sometimes called Entrohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC).

8. Healthcare professionals and members of the public can find more information about travel health (including country specific advice) by logging onto the National Travel Health Network and Centre (NaTHNaC) website www.nathnac.org

9. The Health Protection Agency is an independent UK organisation that was set up by the government in 2003 to protect the public from threats to their health from infectious diseases and environmental hazards. It does this by providing advice and information to the general public, to health professionals such as doctors and nurses, and to national and local government. In 2012 the HPA will become part of Public Health England. To find out more, visit our website: www.hpa.org.uk

10. For media enquiries please contact the national HPA press office at Colindale on 020 8327 7901 or email cfipressoffice@hpa.org.uk. Out of hours the duty press office can be contacted on 020 8200 4400

Sunday, February 06, 2011

HACCP Level 3, Issue 6 BRC, ISO22000

The next course dates have been set.


Intermediate Level 3 HACCP course:- 31st March and 1st April

50% funding could be available, see below.

The above course will be running at Linlithgow Rugby Club and will run from 0900 to 1700 each day.

The HACCP level 3 RSPH certificated course has plenty of work shop activities and is completed with a 1.5 hour exam set by RSPH. The course aims to ensure that delegates gather the necessary skills and confidence to be able to originate or contribute to HACCP studies. Currently over 50% of delegates attending this course with us have been achieving distinction level. The course includes all the workshop materials and templates, Carol Wallace course book as well as lunch and refreshments both days. Cost £550 + VAT per delegate.

The New Issue 6 BRC standard is to be published in July and we will be reviewing the draft in March. All BRC and QMS training will now be focused towards the imminent changes.

ISO22000 training is also going to become available in April 2011.

Funding maybe available up to 50% through the following link to skills development Scotland:-

www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/services-for-employers/encourage-employees-to-develop-new-skills.aspx

Let us know if you wish to attend the scheduled level 3 HACCP course or would like to attend the first of the BRC Issue 6 Implementation or Internal Auditing Courses in the coming months.

Friday, January 07, 2011

Dioxins in Eggs

German authorities have blocked meat and eggs sales from some 4,700 farms across the country after it was revealed that chickens and pigs had eaten feed contaminated with dangerous levels of dioxins.

What are dioxins and why are they dangerous?

According to the World Health Organization, dioxins are a group of highly toxic, chemically-related compounds.

Dioxins can occur through natural processes but they are mainly the by-products of industrial processes including smelting, chlorine bleaching of paper pulp and the manufacturing of some herbicides and pesticides.

Dioxins are found throughout the world in the environment. The highest levels of these compounds are found in some soils, sediments and food, especially dairy products, meat, fish and shellfish.

The higher in the animal food chain, the higher the concentration - and danger - of dioxins.

Once dioxins have entered the human body, they endure a long time because of their chemical stability and their ability to be absorbed by fat tissue, where they are then stored.

They can cause reproductive and developmental problems, damage the immune system, interfere with hormones and cause cancer.

How did the dioxins enter the food chain in Germany?

According to the European Union, the incident began when fatty acids meant to be used for industrial processes - from a biodiesel company - were mixed with vegetable feed fat, used to make food for animals.

The contaminated feed was distributed to several farms in Germany, and consumed by pigs and hens whose meat and eggs now have levels of dioxins higher that those allowed under EU law. Most of the affected farms are pig farms in Germany's Lower Saxony region.

Some of the eggs were sent to a processing plant in the Netherlands, and a 14-tonne consignment of pasteurised egg has been sent on to the UK, where it may have entered the food chain.

EU authorities say they were first informed about the incident by Germany on 27 December 2010. But the first message only referred to one consignment - 26 tonnes - of contaminated feed. By 3 January 2011, German officials realised that the contamination was much bigger - a total of nine consignments - delivered to 25 feed manufacturers.

However, the state agriculture ministry in Schleswig-Holstein says the dioxin alert began even earlier. It says the company where the contaminated oils originated - Harles und Jentzsch - carried out a test in March 2010, which revealed that dioxin levels were twice the permitted level. The company is alleged not to have informed the authorities of this.

However, some test results released later by the ministry showed the fat of the feed contained 77 times the approved amount of dioxin.

Why is the rest of Europe worried?

Europe's food production and processing systems are highly integrated, meaning that tracing which food products have been contaminated, and where, can be complex.

Because of this, the EU says that the best way to prevent human exposure is to strictly control industrial processes to limit the formation of dioxins.

The EU has warned that eggs from farms affected by dioxins have entered the UK in processed products destined for human consumption. The eggs had been sent to the Netherlands for processing and then on to the UK in liquid form where, the BBC has learnt, they have been used by two manufacturers of cakes and quiches.

But this isn't the first time there has been a dioxin-related food scare in Europe, is it?

No, there have been several. In Italy, for example, in early 2008, worries about the levels of dioxins in the buffalo milk used to make some mozzarella cheese led Japan and South Korea to cancel orders. There were allegations that waste incineration in the region around Naples might have led to the higher levels of the carcinogens in the cheese.

Later that same year, all pork products made in the Irish Republic were recalled after it was discovered that some pork contained more than 200 times the acceptable level of dioxins. The pigs were thought to have eaten contaminated feed. A few months later, some 7,000 cattle on 10 Northern Ireland farms were culled because because of fears of dioxin contamination.

How dangerous are the levels of dioxins found?

Authorities in Germany are emphasising that they have closed the farms and blocked sales as a precautionary measure and that all meat, poultry and eggs are safe to eat.

The EU has said that although the eggs found on affected farms in Germany had five times the legal limit of the chemical, consumers would have to eat vast quantities of eggs, or processed products made with these eggs, in order for the dioxins to pose a risk to human health.

Thursday, January 06, 2011

HACCP and Internal Audit Training










The next course dates have been set.

Intermediate Level 3 HACCP course:- 24th and 25th January

British Retail Consortium Internal Auditing Course:- 26th January

The above courses will be running at Linlithgow Rugby Club and will run from 0900 to 1700 each day.

The HACCP level 3 RSPH certificated course has plenty of work shop activities and is completed with a 1.5 hour exam set by RSPH. The course aims to ensure that delegates gather the necessary skills and confidence to be able to originate or contribute to HACCP studies. Currently over 50% of delegates attending this course with us have been achieving distinction level. The course includes all the workshop materials and templates, Carol Wallace course book as well as lunch and refreshments both days. Cost £550 + VAT per delegate.

The Internal Auditing course aims to fulfil the requirements of auditing a BRC Food Standard Quality Management System, Issue 5. It is a one day course covering the key areas that should be in the scope of an internal audit schedule as well as auditing skills and approaches. The course also has some workshop activities to highlight key points in the syllabus. This course is attendance only and is certificated by Outsource Solution Ltd. The course includes all the workshop materials, lunch and refreshments. Cost £250 + VAT per delegate.

Details of both courses are attached as well as a map hyperlink on the HACCP course information. There is plenty of free parking. Should you wish to attend we can make hotel suggestions if required and provide contact information.

Let us know if either of these courses are of interest

Monday, October 11, 2010

2009 Scottish local authority food testing report

A Report by the Scottish Food Enforcement Liaison Committee’s
Research Working Group:- 2009 local authority food testing report.

National Britannia BRC Suspension

BRC Suspension of NB Certification
The BRC formally suspended BRC recognition of NB Certification (also known as
National Britannia) from auditing against all BRC Global Standard certification
schemes on the 24th September 2010.
The Accreditation of NB Certification has also been suspended by their Accreditation
Body UKAS.
The BRC Compliance Manager Karen Betts will be working closely with NB
Certification to review certification processes and ensure that appropriate additional
safeguards have been put in place to ensure the integrity of the BRC scheme.
It is anticipated that a further audit will be undertaken by UKAS in early November to
review the corrective action put in place and establish if the suspension can be lifted.
The swift action taken by the BRC underlines the importance which is placed on the
absolute integrity of the BRC scheme and emphasises the value of complaints and
feed back from users of the schemes in support of our compliance activities.
Consequences of this action:-
Sites with audits pending
NB Certification are not permitted to undertake BRC audits whilst suspended.
Sites with audits currently planned during the suspension period will be contacted by
NB Certification. NB Certification will undertake to work closely with such clients and
to offer to them as an option the provision of accredited audit services using another
BRC recognised accredited certification body. Dispensation will be allowed for a delay
of up to 28 days in the audit dates to accommodate this process.
Audited sites who have not yet been issued with a certificate
NB Certification are not permitted to issue accredited certificates whilst suspended.
This will result in a delay in the issue of certificates whilst suspension remains in
place. Once suspension is lifted sites within the certification process may then be
issued with an accredited certificate. The BRC have made major retailers aware of
the potential for delay in certification. Sites may choose to restart the certification
process with another BRC recognised and accredited certification body if they so wish.
Existing certificated sites
A review has been undertaken of the processes operated by NB Certification to
ensure the validity of currently issued certificates. At this stage there is no reason to
doubt the validity of these certificates and the certificates will be valid for the
duration of the certificate.
When will suspension be lifted ?
The suspension can only be lifted once corrective actions have been put in place and
BRC and UKAS are satisfied that certification processes are again operating
satisfactorily. An audit is scheduled for the beginning of November which will
establish if suspension can be lifted.
For further information contact
NB Certification
+ 44 2920 856509
certification@nbcert.com
Karen Betts
Compliance Manager
Tel 020 78548935

Tuesday, August 31, 2010

HACCP Validation Resources

The National Advisory Committee on Microbiological Criteria for Foods (NACMCF):-
http://www.fsis.usda.gov/About_FSIS/NACMCF/index.asp

Advisory Committee on the Microbiological Safety of Food (ACMSF):- http://acmsf.food.gov.uk/

The Codex Alimentarius Commission was created in 1963 by FAO and WHO to develop food standards, guidelines and related texts such as codes of practice under the Joint FAO/WHO Food Standards Programme. The main purposes of this Programme are protecting health of the consumers and ensuring fair trade practices in the food trade, and promoting coordination of all food standards work undertaken by international governmental and non-governmental organizations.:- http://www.codexalimentarius.net/search/advancedsearch.do

http://ec.europa.eu/food/index_en.htm

http://www.food.gov.uk/aboutus/contactus/

http://www.chilledfood.org/Resources/Chilled%20Food%20Association/Public%20Resources/ECFF20Recommendations20Final201820122006.pdf

Health Protection Scotland
http://www.google.com/reader/view/feed/http%3A%2F%2Fwww.hps.scot.nhs.uk%2Fusingourwebsite%2FFeeds%2FGastroCurrentNews.aspx

Bad Bugs Book
http://www.fda.gov/Food/FoodSafety/FoodborneIllness/FoodborneIllnessFoodbornePathogensNaturalToxins/BadBugBook/default.htm

Outsource Solution News
http://www.outsourcesolution.co.uk/news.php

Outsource Solution RSS blogger link
http://www.google.co.uk/reader/shared/03986148134012621369

Clostridium estertheticum

Spoilage of beef, lamb and venison by psychrophilic and psychrotrophic clostridial species renders meat unacceptable resulting in financial losses and reduced consumer confidence. A number of clostridial strains, including Clostridium algidicarnis, Clostridium algidixylanolyticum, Clostridium estertheticum, Clostridium frigidicarnis and Clostridium gasigenes, have been implicated in red meat spoilage. Unlike other spoilers, these clostridia are able to grow in anaerobic conditions and at chilled temperatures (some at −1.5 °C the optimal storage temperature for chilled red meat). The spoilage they cause is characterised by softening of the meat, production of large amounts of drip (exudates), offensive odours and in the case of C. estertheticum and C. gasigenes production of gas. Spoilage occurs following the introduction of clostridial spores into vacuum packages during processing. Germination of spores is necessary for the growth of vegetative cells, which cause spoilage. Current mitigation strategies focus on good management practice within meat processing plants. However, this is not always sufficient to prevent spoilage.

Monday, August 30, 2010

2010 infections in Scotland

Viral and protozoal pathogens up to Week 32, 2010
Norovirus
During the first 32 weeks of 2010, 2654 reports of norovirus (NV) were received at HPS, an increase of 1632 (160%) compared to the same period in 2009 when there were 1022 reports. This large increase is due to the large number of reports in the first 12 weeks of the year.
During the first half of 2010, 274 general outbreaks of NV were reported to ObSurv, the surveillance system for all general outbreaks of infectious intestinal disease in Scotland. This is an increase of 108 (65%) compared to the first half of 2009 when 166 NV outbreaks were reported. It is however similar to the first half of 2008 during which 249 NV outbreaks were reported. Residential institutions and hospitals have been the two main locations identified in NV outbreaks in 2010, accounting for 50% and 46% of NV outbreaks respectively.
Rotavirus
During the first 32 weeks of 2010, 1684 reports of rotavirus were received at HPS, an increase of 406 (32%) compared to the same period in 2009 when there were 1278 rotavirus reports. The number of reports in 2010 is similar to 2008 when there were 1710 reports.
To date in 2010 there have been no outbreaks of rotavirus reported to ObSurv, the last such outbreak was reported in 2007.
Increased reporting of E. coli O157 infections in 2010
During the first 32 weeks of 2010, HPS received 146 reports of E. coli O157 infections, an increase of 29 (25%) from the same period of 2009. A number of factors may have contributed to this increase.
The number and proportion of secondary and asymptomatic infections, for instance, has increased substantially. In weeks 1-32 of 2010, 26 cases (18%) were secondaries and 14 (10%) were asymptomatic, compared with 15 (13%) secondaries and 2 (2%) asymptomatic in the same period of 2009.

Sunday, July 25, 2010

Carnoustie Team is 'Top of the class'


Co-Operative Farms Carnoustie Team is ‘Top of the Class’
By Bill Longair

Congratulations must go to four of Carnoustie’s team who have recently sat the intermediate level 3 HACCP course with all four candidates achieving distinction level.
This sees our sites ongoing commitment to build a robust internal audit team able to independently meet the challenges of supply into the fresh produce industry.
As Operations Manger I am delighted to quote Mr. Duncan Perry from Outsource Solutions who stated, ‘The first time in which we have ever run a course in which 100% candidates have all achieving ‘distinction’. ‘It is exceptional that a single operational site has achieved this level of competence’.
My personal congratulations goes to Liz Veitch who heads the Quality control side of the operation and this result is a credit to her, her team and the site.
Well done to you all
Pictured from left to right, Liz Veitch, Gillian Craig, Douglas Charlton, Sandra Kizuk and Duncan Perry (Outsource Solutions).

Wednesday, June 30, 2010

legislation link for FSA

http://www.food.gov.uk/enforcement/enforceessential/enforceaz/

link to a FSA resource page.

Wednesday, June 23, 2010

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Since its development in the late 1950’s HACCP has become an internationally recognised tool to help business operators attain a higher standard of food safety. In this time, it has gone from being a recommendation of good practice to being enshrined in legislation. The purpose of HACCP is to ensure a high level of consumer protection with regard to food safety throughout the entire food chain. The HACCP system, according to Codex Alimentarius Commission 2003 (Codex), ISBN 92-5-105106-2, is science based and systematic. The use of HACCP as a tool enables the assessment of specific hazards and measures for their control to ensure the safety of food. It also puts the focus and emphasis on prevention rather than relying on end-product testing.



Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point system - HACCP

HACCP was initially developed by The Pillsbury Company for NASA and its manned space programme back in 1959. It was based on the engineering system Failure, Mode, Effect and Analysis (FMEA) and designed as an alternative to end-product testing as a means of ensuring the safety of food. In order to establish what is a potential hazard the questions; what could go wrong and why, must be considered. The possible outcome and likelihood of occurrence are considered at each stage in the process to produce food fit for consumption by consumers.
HACCP is a systematic approach that is applied throughout the entire food chain, range of applications. The application of a HACCP approach was made mandatory in the European Union by EC regulation 852/2004 in Article 5. This article states that food business operators shall put in place, implement and maintain a permanent procedure or procedures based on the HACCP principles.
Successful implementation requires the full cooperation and commitment of food business employees at all levels along with relevant training at all levels. Training requirements should be considered prior to the implementation of a HACCP system. In addition, business operators must provide the competent authority with evidence of compliance and training. This can be achieved by using a training programme accredited by a body such as Royal Society for Public Health (RSPH).



Protection of public health

A European Community White Paper on food safety published in January 2000 stated that “The production and consumption of food is central to any society, and has economic, social and, in many cases, environmental consequences.” It also emphasised that health protection must always take priority over all other issues and that every link along the food chain, from farm to fork must be as strong as the others if consumers are to be adequately protected. The paper acknowledged the need to re-establish confidence in the safety of food supply following a number of crises within the food supply chain during the 1990’s. Bovine Spongiform Encephalitis (BSE) and antibiotic use (for growth promotion) and subsequent resistance issues were just a few of the problems during the 1990’s.
There were also several outbreaks of foodborne illness, such as the Eschericia coli outbreak of 19962 and others throughout the 1990’s some of which proved fatal for a number of vulnerable people. As stated by the World Health Organisation’s Codex Alimentarius Committee, (Codex), “people have the right to expect the food they eat to be safe and suitable for consumption”.
In 2003 Codex recommended a HACCP-based approach as a means to enhance food safety. On 1st January 2006 Regulation (EC) No 852/2004 became effective. Food businesses in the UN are now required by law to implement a food safety management system based on Codex HACCP principles.



HACCP in Action

From the 1st of January 2006, when Regulation (EC) No 852/2004 came into effect, HACCP (or a food safety management system based on HACCP principles) was no longer optional for many food businesses, but became mandatory. It is the responsibility of businesses to comply with the regulation and the responsibility of local authorities to inspect and enforce it.
There are many benefits to businesses using HACCP as a tool, among them are a reduced likelihood of food poisoning outbreaks, a reduction in customer complaints, standardised training and more importantly compliance with legislation. Evidence of a live HACCP system and proof of food safety compliance is often a pre-requisite to trading with some suppliers.
A properly documented HACCP system offers inspectors evidence that essential process conditions were under control throughout processing, making inspections easier.
Before HACCP can be implemented within a process there are various steps, or pre-requisites, that need to be in place. One of these pre-requisites is training. To successfully implement HACCP training is required for HACCP team members and senior management. Training of senior management is crucial to ensure awareness and commitment to HACCP throughout. Clearly not everybody requires the same training and making sure that training is specific to employee level and operational status is an important factor for consideration as is the quality of the training given.
There are many HACCP training providers but one that is suitably accredited must be selected to ensure integrity of the HACCP system to which the training will be applied. Codex states that “Those engaged in food operations who come directly or indirectly into contact with food should be trained, and/or instructed in food hygiene to a level appropriate to the operations they are to perform”, and acknowledges that training is fundamentally important to any food hygiene system, with inadequate training of all personnel being a potential threat to the safety of food.
Training programmes should be routinely reviewed in order to ensure they take into account any changes in legislation, technology, processing procedures or emerging pathogens.






Development Timeline

YEAR PROGRESS/STEP
1950’s /60’s The engineering system of Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) was adapted to form the beginnings of the HACCP system.
1970’s HACCP presented to public at a food protection conference which led to a number of large food manufacturers starting to use the HACCP approach. (Not required by regulators nor promoted internationally at this stage.)
1980’s Greater uptake of HACCP approach due to the recommendation by US National Academy of Science and the International Commission for Microbiological Criteria for Foods.
1994


1995 Full international acceptance of HACCP with the World Health Organisation’s Codex Alimentarius Committee on food hygiene, publishing HACCP principles.
EC Directive on the Hygiene of Foodstuffs (93/43) implemented through the Food Safety Regulations 1995.


2006/08 Commission of the European Communities publishes a white paper on food safety proposing a new approach driven by the need to guarantee a high level of food safety.
European Commission Decision 2001/471/EC requires the application of HACCP principles in licensed fresh meat & poultry meat plants and lays down certain microbiological test procedures. Member states are required to implement the decision by 7th June 2002.
European Food Safety Authority established through Regulation 178/2002. Voluntary Codes of Practice introduce a requirement for HACCP systems within the feed industry part of the food chain.
Feed Additive Regulation (1831/2003).
Food Hygiene Regulation (852/2004) All businesses shall put in place, implement and maintain permanent procedures based on HACCP principles.
Food Hygiene Scotland Regulation 2006
Feed Hygiene Regulation (183/2005) HACCP systems must be registered/approved for all except primary producers (farmers). Personnel must be trained in hygiene issues and HACCP.
Feed businesses must register with local authorities and must develop and implement HACCP systems within their operation.

This decade saw the beginnings of encompassing the entire food chain from farm to fork with regulation on the feed being fed to animals which were intended for human consumption.
2010 In accordance with Regulation (EC) 853/2004, from January 1st 2010 Food Chain Information (FCI) is required for all Cattle, Sheep and Goats submitted for slaughter for human consumption. (Required for Poultry 2006, Pigs 2008 and Calves and Horses 2009)


The above list is not an exhaustive list of legislation pertaining to food and feed businesses, passed to date.

Conclusion

Successful application of HACCP requires the full commitment and involvement of management and the workforce. The international standard ISO 22000 requires that management provide evidence of its ongoing commitment to a food safety management system. The efficacy of any HACCP system is reliant on management and employees having the appropriate HACCP knowledge and skills1, therefore ongoing training is essential for all levels of employees. It is the responsibility of each individual business to ensure they have robust HACCP processes in place which are fully documented. Constant changes in processing technology, emerging pathogens and staff turnover necessitate continuous review of HACCP procedures and training requirements.
Attention should be given to the quality of training provided which should ideally be accredited by a body such as the Royal Society for Public Health (RSPH). Such accreditation allows a company to demonstrate that staff have undertaken training which meets appropriate standards to ensure highest level of food safety.

Tuesday, June 15, 2010

HACCP level 3 Training

The next HACCP level 3 course has been set for the 8th and 9th July.

The course is certificated by RSPH and includes course book and materials. There is a 90 minute exam at the end of the second day.

There is an emphasis on practical implementation and this is enhanced by plenty of workshop exercises.

As a training centre we curently have an over 50% distinction pass level.

If you would like to book a place on the next course email us on perry@outsourcesolution.co.uk

For any other training relating to Food Safety or BRC please visit our web site at www.outsourcesolution.co.uk

Thursday, May 20, 2010

Food Safety Courses


The next Food safety training courses have been scheduled:-


The courses running are


REHIS level 2 HACCP training on the 31st May


RSPH level 3 HACCP training on the 17th and 18th June


For level 3 training we are currently have over 50% delegates achieving a distinction level.


Both of our courses are being run at our training suite at junction 4 of the M8 http://foodsafetyuk.blogspot.com/2010/01/training-suite-directions.html


The level 3 training takes into consideration Codex, BRC requirements and ISO22000


The courses run every 2 -3 months. For up to date information and details of other courses visit our web site at:-



Contact Duncan Perry by email perry@outsourcesolution.co.uk or complete our contact form on http://www.foodtrainingsolution.co.uk/mwebform.asp

Thursday, January 28, 2010

Food Safety Course Spring 2010

The next set of Food Safety Courses have been scheduled for Spring 2010

These are :-

BRC Implementation and Internal Auditing:- 15th February

RSPH Level 3 HACCP Intermediate:- 11th and 12th March

For more information visit http://www.outsourcesolution.co.uk/training.html
or email mailto:perry@outsourcesolution.co.uk

Tuesday, January 05, 2010

Level 3 HACCP

RSPH Level 3 Award in HACCP for Food Manufacturing

26th and 27th January, Easter Inch, Bathgate

This qualification is primarily aimed at supervisors/junior managers working within the food manufacturing industry, but will also be of benefit to caterers and retailers. Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) provides an effective and practicable management tool for identifying food safety hazards and ensuring that adequate controls are in place.

This Level 3 qualification covers the importance of HACCP-based food safety management procedures, the preliminary processes for HACCP-based procedures, development of the procedures, monitoring of critical control points and corrective actions and the evaluation of the procedures. Outsource Solution place a particular emphasis on workshop activities to establish a robust understanding of the HACCP implementation process.
Holders of this qualification will have the appropriate knowledge and understanding to be an integral part of a HACCP team and to supervise the implementation of a HACCP-based system in the work environment.
This qualification is based on the National Occupational Standards developed by Improve, the Sector Skills Council, for the Food and Drink Manufacturing Industry and conforms to the qualification template developed by RSPH, other awarding bodies and Improve.
This programme is delivered over two days and assessment is by a 90 minute examination consisting of 45 multiple-choice questions.

Monday, January 04, 2010

Training Suite Directions









The easiest route from the M8 is to exit at junction 4. Drive to the second round about and take the 4th exit (as shown on the map in red) A7066.






After 1.9 miles take the first slip road. At the round about take the first exit onto the B792 (Loch View).
Go through the underpass.
At the next round about take the 1st exit.
At the next round about (~200m) take the second exit.
At the next round about (~100m) take the first exit into the Evans Easyspace complex. (The Evans signage is very good)




As you come into the units from the round about bear to your right, we are the far right corner unit at the same side as you have entered (ie the furthest right / south east, closest to the steadings) The unit has its own entrance and signage to the far side of the building .

Wednesday, September 23, 2009

Level 3 HACCP course

Outsource Solution will be running a level 3 RSPH Intermediate HACCP course on the 4th and 5th November at our training room off junction 4 of the M8 (Bathgate). Details are below:

4th and 5th November

RSPH Intermediate HACCP (level3)

2 day course with the 2 hour RSPH exam and certification.

Emphasis on practical case study, workshop and implementation.

Full course materials provided

Syllabus



1. Assemble HACCP team


2. Describe product


3. Identify intended use


4. Construct flow diagram and verification


5. On-site verification of flow diagram


6. List all potential hazards, conduct a hazard analysis, consider control measures, risk assessment, validation


7. Determine CCPs


8. Establish critical limits for each CRITICAL CONTROL POINTS and validation


9. Establish a monitoring system for each CCP


10. Establish corrective actions


11. Establish verification procedures


12. Establish documentation and record keeping.



Venue: Easter Inch, Bathgate

Cost: £550




There are also a few places left on the BRC Internal Auditor Course being held on the 2nd October.



Should either course be of any interest to you please contact Helen via email – perry@outsourcesolution.co.uk

Thursday, September 10, 2009

Data Capture

Data Capture Food Quality Management Systems

Outsource Solution Ltd has developed a computer based data capture program. The system is designed to replace paper based monitoring activities with computer and PDA data entry.

The applications include monitoring data for:-

HACCP
British Retail Consortium Quality Management Systems
Traceability Systems
Key Performance Indicator Information
Health and Safety Records
Training Records

The information is captured on a web based database and can be recovered with a secure login anywhere in the world on a computer with internet access.

The advantages of such systems are end less and include:-

Fast data recovery and report generation
Data reporting on all query parameters
Report integration of monitoring activities
Trend analysis for verification of effectiveness of systems
Automatic secure authentication of record generation
Reduction of paper and filing systems (no requirement for scanning archiving systems)
Business improvement potential and efficiency due to access to information
Report generation and performance monitoring remote from the business

The system in its basic form is for data capture, however, its development can include:-

Automatic data capture from other monitoring devices such as temperature loggers, counters, meters etc
Importing data from other sources
Creating alert systems by email or SMS

System Development

This system is not a costly pre developed package. It uses well established secure internet based systems. It can be as small or as large a data capture system as you require and the development cost reflects that. The system can be expanded or changed at any time to reflect your business. Because the system is internet based there is no tie in to expensive manufacturer’s hardware.

For more information or to make a booking please contact Duncan:-
perry@outsourcesolution.co.uk
:www.outsourcesolution.co.uk
:0796 227 4446 :01506 631254
7:08715289767

Wednesday, July 29, 2009

Forth Coming Food Safety and HACCP courses

Outsource Solution Ltd have the following courses running in August and September 2009. These are being held at our training suite off junction 4 of the M8 where there is plenty of free parking and a comfortable, relaxed environment.

27th and 28th August
RSPH Level 3 in Food Safety for Supervision for Manufacturing

1. Food Safety Procedures
2. Responsibilities of employees
3. Enforcement of legislation
4. Personnel hygiene
5. Housekeeping and hygiene
6. Contamination and Cross contamination
7. Waste disposal
8. Pest Control
9. Food Safety hazards
10. Controlling Food Safety
11. Temperature
12. Traceability
13 Training

10th & 11th September
RSPH Intermediate HACCP (level3)

2 day course with the 2 hour RSPH exam and certification.
Emphasis on the NEW practical manufacturing syllabus and implementation. Full course materials provided 2 day course with the 2 hour RSPH exam and certification.
1. Assemble HACCP team
2. Describe product
3. Identify intended use
4. Construct flow diagram
5. On-site verification of flow diagram
6. List all potential hazards, conduct a hazard analysis, consider control measures
7. Determine CCPs
8. Establish critical limits for each CRITICAL CONTROL POINTS
9. Establish a monitoring system for each CCP
10. Establish corrective actions
11. Establish verification procedures
12. Establish documentation and record keeping.

25th September
Food Microbiology and Allergen Course (HACCP validation and verification)

1 day attendance Outsource Solution certificated course with work shops. Full course materials provided.
1.Introduction and Background
2.Food Pathogens
Organisms of Concern, Sources and Associated Foods
Routes of Contamination
4.Significant Cases
5.Spoilage and Shelf Life Testing
6.Shelf Life Extension
7.History of Micro Testing
8.Allergens sources and risk assessment.
9.Testing Laboratories,EN17025
10.Expression of Results
11.Interpretation of Results
12.Acceptation and Rejection of Results
13.Generic Testing Methodologies. Traditional, Rapid &
14.Result trending, HACCP validation and verification

2nd October
Internal Auditing, British Retail Consortium Standard

Emphasis on practical case study, workshop and implementation.
Full course materials provided 1 day attendance certificated course with work shops. Full course materials provided.
1. Scope of Standard
2. Fundamental Clauses
3. Standard Contents – 7 Sections
4. Audit Documentation
5. Spirit of the Audit
6. Conducting the Audit
7. Audit Review
8. Factory Floor Audit
9. Audit Trails
10. Audit Process
11. Objective Evidence
12. Reports
13. Non compliance report
14. Non compliance classification
15. British Retail Consortium Guidelines
16. Main Issues Found
17. Corrective Action

Please contact us if you require any further information or would like to book a place.

Contact Duncan at perry@outsourcesolution.co.uk, 01506 631254

Tuesday, April 21, 2009

Food Safety Courses, Scotland

Forth Coming Courses

14th & 15th May

RSPH Intermediate HACCP (level3)

12 th June

Internal Auditing

British Retail Consortium Standard

29th & 30th June

RSPH Level 3 in Food Safety for Supervision for Manufacturing

2 day course with the 2 hour RSPH exam and certification.

Emphasis on practical case study, workshop and implementation.

Full course materials provided

1 day attendance certificated course with work shops. Full course materials provided.

2 day course with the 2 hour RSPH exam and certification.

Emphasis on the NEW practical manufacturing syllabus and implementation.

Full course materials provided

Syllabus

1. Assemble HACCP team

2. Describe product

3. Identify intended use

4. Construct flow diagram

5. On-site verification of flow diagram

6. List all potential hazards, conduct a hazard analysis, consider control measures

7. Determine CCPs

8. Establish critical limits for each CCP

9. Establish a monitoring system for each CCP

10. Establish corrective actions

11. Establish verification procedures

12. Establish documentation and record keeping.

Syllabus

1. Scope of Standard

2. Fundamental Clauses

3. Standard Contents – 7 Sections

4. Audit Documentation

5. Spirit of the Audit

6. Conducting the Audit

7. Audit Review

8. Factory Floor Audit

9. Audit Trails

10. Audit Process

11. Objective Evidence

12. Reports

13. Non compliance report

14. Non compliance classification

15. British Retail Consortium Guidelines

16. Main Issues Found

17. Corrective Action

Syllabus

1. Food Safety Procedures

2. Responsibilities of employees

3. Enforcement of legislation

4. Personnel hygiene

5. Housekeeping and hygiene

6. Contamination and Cross contamination

7. Waste disposal

8. Pest Control

9. Food Safety hazards

10. Controlling Food Safety

11. Temperature

12. Traceability

13 Training

Venue

Easter Inch, Bathgate

Cost

£550

Venue

Easter Inch, Bathgate

Cost

£300

Venue

Easter Inch, Bathgate

Cost

£550

For all courses, delegates are encouraged to participate and seek relevant practical information on all aspects of application into their own business.

If specific learning outcomes can be identified before attendance this can be very helpful.

Let me know if you would like any delegates to attend any of the above courses or require any further information.

Kind regards

Duncan Perry

Tuesday, April 07, 2009

HACCP and BRC Internal Audit Training

The dates of next courses have been set.

The next BRC Internal Auditing course will be held on the 6th May.
The RSPH level 3 HACCP course will run on the 14th and 15th May.

Both courses will be held at our premises just next to J4 of the M8.

Let us know if you would like further information.

Contact Duncan on 01506 631254 or email perry@outsourcesolution.co.uk

Monday, December 08, 2008

Food Safety Courses January 2009

Forth Coming Food Safety Courses for January 2009

13th and 14th January RIPH certificated Intermediate HACCP
This course gives excellent practical training on the HACCP principles and their application. The course is filled with a mix of theory and workshops facilitating any delegate to approach future HACCP projects with confidence. An exam at the end ensures that the delegate can demonstrate competency through independent certification. The course is ideal for anyone who is part of a HACCP team, including team leaders.


26th and 27th January RIPH certificated Intermediate Food Hygiene
This course is designed for individuals who are in Quality or Supervisory roles. This course provides the delegate with an excellent understanding of Food Safety allowing them to assess procedures, practices and incidents.


28th January Food Microbiology Course
This course is suitable for Quality or Technical Managers, Internal Auditors and Technical Support staff. The course is aimed at fulfilling the requirements of the BRC global standard Food Issue 5 in areas such as Process (HACCP) and Hygiene validation and new product development. In particular, the course aims to equip delegates with the appropriate knowledge to validate their HACCP plans, including the identification of appropriate organisms of concern and acceptable levels.


23rd February BRC Issue 5 Update course
Course Content
· The Standards development
· HACCP
· In depth review of the Standard
· Standard interpretation
· The protocol and certification process
· Interactive workshops with case studies


24th February BRC Internal Auditing Course
Course Content
· Internal Auditing
· Standard interpretation
· Interactive workshops with case studies


March (date to be set) Food Labelling NEW
Course Content
· Nutritional labelling
· QUID
· Weight declarations
· Product claims
· Preservatives / Allergens
· Trace and durability coding

All the courses will be held at our training suite just 2 minutes from junction 4 of the M8. It is easy to find and there is ample free parking.

Please contact us if any of the above courses are of interest or if you would like further information and a quotation. perry@outsourcesolution.co.uk

Tuesday, November 04, 2008

Training Suite available for hire


Our new training facillity is an ideal environment with all the training resources required. We have created this to deliver our own training courses, however, we have the capacity to hire the unit out to others for a similar purpose. Catering and beveridges are available. Full audio visual facillities have been fitted and includes:-


Laptop projector (with backup Bulb)
Projector linked Audio System
7 ft X 5 ft Vutec projector screen
Panasonic 5 ft X 3.5 ft white board with double display and printer
Flip chart
Secondary projection screen

The site is very easy to find without the requirement to travel through a city or town to the venue and there is plenty of free parking. Address:-
Unit 3, Outsource Solution Ltd
Evans Easyspace
Easter Inch, Bathgate, EH48 2EH

You will find this a very competitive solution in an ideal training / meeting environment.
Email us with your requirements.

Sunday, October 12, 2008

Tuesday, September 23, 2008

BRC and Food safety training

The next courses have now been scheduled. These will now take place at our new training suite. Due to its location, there is no requirement to navigate through any towns once on the motorway network and there is plenty of free parking. This is within a new build site and has been furnished to a high standard with excellent audio visual presentation facilities.

The forth coming course are:-

BRC Implementation 8th and 9th October

This is the BRC certificated 2 day Implementation course. The course covers the full standard requirements including:-The Standards development, HACCP, An in depth review of the standard, Interpretation and guidelines, The protocol and certification process, Report writing and management reporting, Interactive workshops and case studies, An optional examination to demonstrate competence in the standard and its application. An attendance certificate is also available.
A free copy of the BRC standard is now included. The course costs £650 plus VAT. If you already have a copy of the standard and do not require us to supply a copy, a 10% discount will apply.

RIPH Certificated Intermediate HACCP 16th and 17th October.

This is the RIPH registered and certificated course. Included is a detailed understanding of the HACCP principles and 12 logical steps,
Practical implementation of a HACCP plan,
Course book- Intermediate HACCP by Carol Wallace,
Exam,

Rapid supervised workshop activities which assists with implementation and a successful examination outcome.

The course costs £450.00 plus VAT..

Courses that will be running shortly are
BRC update (1day course),
Intermediate Food hygiene,
Introductory HACCP,
Microbiology (including allergens) course.
Please let us know if any of the above is of interest, if you require any further information, or if you would like to book any places.

perry@outsourcesolution.co.uk

01506631254

Our complete our online form by following this link:-http://www.foodtrainingsolution.co.uk/mwebform.asp